msp-student-selected-for-law-prep-program

MSP student selected for distinguished summer
law prep program

By Aaron Marshall

While summer spells a break from studying for most students, Morrill Scholar Tziporah Tiller is headed for a prestigious summer program that helps students from diverse backgrounds prep for law school.

Tiller is one of just 20 students nationwide to be accepted into TRIALS (Training and Recruitment Initiative for Admission to Leading Law Schools), a five-week crash course in the LSAT for students of color and others from non-traditional backgrounds that fires up June 30. The program is run jointly by Harvard Law School and the New York University School of Law.

“I want to speak for the underdog, I want to speak for the misunderstood, I want to advocate for them,” Tiller said. “That’s my main motivation for wanting to pursue the law. In my opinion, it’s the best way I can see social change happening in this country.”

A second-year Buckeye majoring in pre-law, Tiller became interested in the law when she saw ACLU lawyers swing into action to fight the federal government’s proposed Muslim travel ban. “I like how the law is—it can be slow, but still one little change can make a world of difference. I like that duality,” she said. “It may take a minute for things to change, but, on the other hand, things can change in an instant.”

The summer trip to Boston will be Tiller’s second extended trip away from home as she went on ODI’s France-Morocco trip in 2018. “France colonized Morocco, so we were exploring what that relationship was like during the colonial era and what’s it like now,” she said. “It was very interesting to see how race operates in France.”

In my opinion it’s the best way I can see social change happening in this country.

I’m going to try and give myself more time to take it in March.

Being a lawyer who has advocacy and the underdog in the front of my mind, I feel like I can really do some good. Everyone is affected by the law, everybody needs the law in some way.

What I want to do with my life is advocate for people. I didn’t realize I wanted to be a lawyer until my junior year of high school when Trump was elected. I saw all of those ACLU attorneys dropping everything and fighting the Muslim travel ban.

“I want to speak for the underdog, I want to speak for the misunderstood, I want to advocate for them,” she said. “That’s my main motivation for wanting to pursue the law.

I could see myself gogint he practicnign route or the policy route. I honestly see myself at the end of my career dodingosmehtign in the policy arena.

I like how the law is—it can be slow btu still one little change can make a world fo difference. I like that duality. It may take a minte for thigns to change, but, on the toher hand, things can change in an instant.