Current Scholar Spotlight: Bryson McEachin

Bryson McEachin standing in front of scoreboard at Ohio StadiumGrowing up, Bryson McEachin thought he wanted to be a veterinarian. But once he got older, he realized that science wasn’t his thing. Having always been a good writer, a good reader, Bryson though he might try being a court clerk like his dad, but by his senior year of high school, Bryson realized that that wasn’t what he wanted to do. “What am I passionate about? What do I care about? I realized that I was passionate about New York City, its people, the communities, the Bronx, Harlem, Queens, and Brooklyn.” Thinking about a future career, Bryson wondered how that passion could be applied to college. His interests in advocacy, public office, and city government made Bryson think of political science. “I care about politics, and political science would be the perfect fit.”

Major decided, Bryson began to consider what colleges and universities he would apply to. His decisions were based on experiences he had attending high school in Winchester, Massachusetts, even though he was born and raised in the Bronx and now calls Harlem home. “I went there through a program called ABC, A Better Chance. It’s a program across the nation affiliated with high schools, boarding schools, private schools, even public high schools. They help bring students from the inner city and provide them with better educational opportunities at other schools.”

After being away for four years in Massachusetts, Bryson knew he didn’t want to go back to New York for college, but he still wanted a school with an urban setting and a fun and exuberant campus. “That’s what drew me to Ohio State. It is a big school with a lot of people, and it’s diverse, so you can meet people from all across the world and the country. And I’m a big sports fan, so sports did play a part!”

Once he got accepted, Bryson came to Ohio State to visit, and he fell in love with the campus. “All the people that I interacted with, the faculty and staff, they made me feel like they wanted me here. And it’s been a great decision.”

Towards the end of his senior year in high school, Bryson received an email from the Bell National Resource Center on the African American Male (BNRC) saying that he’d been accepted into their Early Arrival Program (EAP). The program brings Black male freshmen to campus a few days early to meet with mentors and each other. “I didn’t know what the BNRC was. At Ohio State, you don’t really think about Black students, so seeing other Black male students who are doing well, who are striving and are a close knit community, made me feel good about myself and that I could succeed here.”

Bryson credits EAP with making his freshman year a good experience. “If I didn’t do EAP, my freshman year would have been a lot different. I wouldn’t have met a lot of people including my best friends. And starting off the year with people you already know, that’s one less thing to worry about.”

Having such a positive experience during EAP, to pay it forward, this past year Bryson became a BNRC Ambassador, providing mentorship to incoming students. He was also part of the BNRC’s Leadership Institute and the Black Male Retreat last year, which was eye-opening. “I didn’t have it easy growing up because I grew up in a single parent household, but at the same time, I didn’t have it that hard. So hearing the stories from my friends at the BNRC, who opened up about their childhood, I realized how lucky I was.” This past autumn, Bryson was also a BNRC middle school mentor. “We helped the students with their behaviors, got their minds flowing about ideas, and taught and mentored them.”

Bryson also credits others for the important roles they have played in his life. “My great-grandmother passed away when I was 10 years old. She was the one who for birthday presents – usually kids get toys – bought me books. She stressed education for me, and my mom, too.” For Bryson, not going to college wasn’t an option. “I’m a fifth generation college student in my family, so I knew I was going. My great-grandmother tried her best to prepare me for that.”

While at Winchester, Bryson’s Resident Director, Jamoul, as well as his father, helped to prepare him to be a man. “They taught me that you have to take responsibility for your actions. Be self-aware. It’s ok to make mistakes, but don’t make the same mistake again. That helped me learn how to behave here at Ohio State.”

This summer, Bryson will be doing a study abroad as an intern to a member of the Canadian Parliament for five weeks. “I will be interning for a liberal MP, Ali Ehsassi. He focuses on human rights, and I’ll be working in his office doing whatever they need me to do.” Bryson will be living in Ottawa during that time with about 28 or so other students from Ohio State and other universities. When he returns from Canada, an internship with the Manhattan Borough president, Gale Brewer, will be waiting.

A sophomore, Bryson plans to graduate in the spring of 2020. His plans after graduation are something he’s “still working on,” but everything he’s done so far has been preparing him for a job in city government in New York City as an elected public official like a borough president or mayor. “The future doesn’t really happen as you expect it, so who knows what will happen and where I will end up, but in my mind, I want to work in NYC or for the state of New York.”


Prior Spotlights

Korrie Johnson Spotlight

Korrie Johnson Spotlight

Growing up in Memphis, Tennessee, Korrie Johnson had plenty of support from family and friends. “I had people who looked like me to serve as role models, give me support and tell me that I was going to do great things.” So when Korrie made the decision to pursue a PhD, he knew that it would be very important for any university he chose to have an active diversity unit. Read more on Korrie Johnson.

Martín Pérez Spotlight

Martín Pérez Spotlight

As a Latino, Martín Pérez understands the issues that many underrepresented students can face and the need for a community of like-minded individuals who want to celebrate and educate others on different ethnicities. As a first-generation college student, Martín also understands the value of an education, a viewpoint, he says, that’s summed up by the Kofi Annan quote, “Education is the premise of progress, in every society, in every family.” Read more.

Brandon Blackwell Spotlight

Brandon Blackwell Spotlight

Student athletes often can face some hurdles when pursuing their college degree. Whether it’s trying to maintain good grades or practicing for a sport at which they excel, taking full advantage of the resources available from the Office of Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) can alleviate some of the pressure of being a college student. Read more.

Alejandra Maíz Spotlight

Alejandra Maíz Spotlight

Conducting breast cancer research at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is just one way that Alejandra Maíz has used the knowledge she gained in the classroom, working together with her lab group and expanding on those ideas. A junior studying molecular genetics – an area that interests her because of the inheritance patterns of traits and diseases – Alejandra is also using her skills by volunteering at La Clínica Latina, a free clinic held by Ohio State’s College of Medicine for Spanish-speaking individuals that provides on-going, comprehensive healthcare. Read more.

Ariane Krumel Spotlight

Ariane Krumel Spotlight

The Ohio State University has a lot to offer its students: 175 majors, 14 colleges, and an estimated 12,000 courses. But beyond the excitement those numbers can generate for incoming undergraduates, transfer students from smaller schools might find Ohio State a little bit intimidating with a campus that covers more than 1,700 acres, has 451 buildings, and boasts nearly 50,000 undergraduate students. Read more.

Michael Mullen II Spotlight

Michael Mullen II Spotlight

Michael Mullen II, a senior majoring in Film Studies, has found guidance and support for both life and classes at The Ohio State University from the Todd A. Bell National Recourse Center on the African American Male (BNRC). “Between Tai Cornute, Todd Suddeth, and Robert Bennett III, I have found a trio of educated mentors who have done much to help me succeed,” he stated. Read more.

Paloma Arroyo Spotlight

Paloma Arroyo Spotlight

Advocating for the importance of diversity is something that Paloma Arroyo has always been passionate about; she has participated in Latino Role Models Day and in the Gates Millennium-HSF Bridge Builders Forum, where she assisted faculty with informing Latino parents and their children about the college. Read more.

Kiara Brown

Kiara Brown

While in the sixth grade, Kiara Brown found out about an opportunity offered by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion’s Young Scholars Program (YSP) when staff from the Cleveland Young Scholars program came to speak at her school, the Cleveland School of the Arts. Read more.

Vincent Johns, Jr.

Vincent Johns, Jr.

Vincent Johns, Jr. has had a love for transportation systems ever since the age of four. “I chose to enter the field of civil engineering to help the aging infrastructure systems and to improve the safety and quality of our roads within our communities and nation,” Vincent stated. The need for infrastructure restoration was especially evident to Vincent in New Orleans. Read more.


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