Research and Grants

stack of books, some open, some closed

The Center has a focus on research and evaluation, which makes it one of the few centers in the country that conducts research specifically on African American males throughout the lifespan.

Current Research

  • Faulk, D., Bennett, R. A., III & Moore, J.L., III. (2017). "Gamed by the System: Exploring Black Male Youths' Motivation to Participate in Sports" in Boyhood Studies, Volume 10, No. 1 (Spring 2017), 88-100.
  • Hines, E. M., Moore III, J. L.Mayes, R. D., Harris, P. C., Vega, D., Robinson, D. V., Gray, C. N., & Jackson, C. E. (2017). Making student achievement a priority: The role of school counselors in turnaround schools. Urban Education, 1-22.
  • Mayes, R. D. & Moore, J. L., III (2016) Adversity and pitfalls of twice exceptional urban learners. Journal of Advanced Academics27(3), 167-189.
  • Mayes, R. D. & Moore, J. L., III. (2016). The intersection of race, disability, and giftedness: Understanding the education needs of twice-exceptional, African American students.Gifted Child Today,39(2), 98-104.
  • Bennett, R. A., III, Hodge, S. R., Graham, D. L., & Moore, J. L., III. (Eds.) (2015). Black males and intercollegiate athletics: An exploration of problems and solutions. United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Moore, J. L., III, & Lewis, C. W. (Eds.). (2014). African American Male Students in PreK-12 Schools: Implications for Research, Practice, and PolicyUnited Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Robinson, D. V., Vega, D., Moore, J. L., IIIMayes, R. D., & Robinson, J. R (2014). Chutes and ladders: Young African American Males navigating potholes to climb to success. In C. W. Lewis & J. L. Moore, III (Eds). African American male students in preK-12 schools: Implications for research, practice, and policy. (pp. 107-124). Bristol, UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
  • Robinson, D. V., Moore, J. L., III, & Mayes, R. D. (2013). Two gifted African American brothers achieving in spite of the odds. In T. C. Grantham, M. F. Trotman Scott & D. Harmon (Eds.), Young, triumphant, and Black (pp.79-83). Waco, TX: Purfrock Press, Inc.
  • Nassar-McMillan, S.C., Moore, J. L., III, Warfield, H. A., & Mayes, R. D. (2013). Global diversity issues in counseling. In T. H. Hohenshil, N. E. Amundson, & S. G. Niles (Eds.), Counseling around the world: An international handbook (pp. 9-20). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association
  • Moore, J. L., III, & Lewis, C. W. (Eds.). (2012). African American students in urban schools: Critical issues and solutions for achievementNew York: Peter Lang Publishers.

Completed Projects

In April 2016, Dr. James L. Moore III (co-principal investigator), was awarded a $100,000 grantfor the Cultivating Healthy Communities program to fund Urban GEMS (Gardening Entrepreneurs Motivating Sustainability). The project focuses on career training and nutrition education for African American male students and other educationally-vulnerable youth interested in food sustainability careers through a two-semester, academic and hands-on project-based learning curriculum. Urban GEMS is a collaborative research project with Dr. Deanna Wilkinson, Associate Professor in the Department of Human Sciences. 

In January 2010, Dr. James L. Moore III (co-principal investigator) was awarded a 1- year, seed grant ($25,000) from OSU’s College of Education and Human Ecology to identify violent hot spots in Columbus, Ohio. This seed grant is a collaborative research project with Dr. Deanna Wilkerson and Dr. David Andrews of the College of Education and Human Ecology.

In September 2009, Dr. James L. Moore III (co-principal investigator) was awarded a 3-year National Science Foundation grant ($499,890) to examine the similarities and differences between female and male science, technology, engineering, and mathematics students in terms of their levels of academic motivations, academic and social integration in the university environment, perceptions of the campus environment, student involvement on campus, academic self-concepts, educational aspirations, and vocational commitment. The grant is a collaborative research project with Dr. Morris Clark, Associate Professor of Biochemistry, at Winston-Salem State University and Dr. Lamont A. Flowers, Distinguished Professor and Executive Director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience, at Clemson University.

In September 2008, Dr. James L. Moore III (co-principal investigator) was awarded a 3-year National Science Foundation grant ($499,981) to study the extent to which online courses in the STEM disciplines enhance African American male and female students’ learning and student engagement at historically Black colleges and universities. The grant is a collaborative research project with Dr. Lawrence O. Flowers, Assistant Professor of Microbiology, at Fayetteville State University and Dr. Lamont A. Flowers, Distinguished Professor and Executive Director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience, at Clemson University.

In September 2008, Dr. James L. Moore III (co-principal investigator) was awarded a 4-year, AT&T High School Success Special Grant ($389,678) to develop Student Success Centers at two targeted urban high schools (i.e., Linden-McKinley and South) in Columbus City Schools. The Centers will provide mentoring, career/college advisement, specialized counseling services, and academics training to at-risk, ninth graders. Dr. Collette Dollarhide of the College of Education and Human Ecology is the co-principal investigator for this project.

In March 2008, Dr. James L. Moore III (principal investigator) was awarded a 16-month contract ($403,577) from the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services to evaluate the governor’s statewide achievement gap initiative focusing on ninth grade African American males in high schools throughout Ohio. Dr. Dorinda Gallant of the College of Education and Human Ecology was the co-principal investigator for this project.

Bell Resource Center Clearinghouse Project

Justin Moses, a 2007 graduate of The Ohio State University College of Law and School of Educational Policy and Leadership, created the Bell Resource Center Clearinghouse Project during the time he served as practicum student for the Center. The Clearinghouse Project is an organized collection of information from various periodicals and other sources for the purpose of facilitating further research on African American men in college.

Please contact the Bell Resource Center for any updates, revisions, and or other suggestions for the Clearinghouse Project.

The research has been separated into three components:

Please contact the Bell Resource Center at 614-247-4765 for any questions or concerns.